Friday, December 7, 2018

RIP Tim Rossovich


Former USC and Eagles Defensive End Tim Rossovich Dies at 72

Minute Media Top 2018
By Mike Luciano
December 7, 2018

​The ​NFL and ​college football families lost another tremendous ambassador today as former ​Eagles defensive end Tim Rossovich passes away after an extended illness.

He was 72 years old.

Rossovich was born on March 14, 1946 in Palo Alto, Calif. Rossovich was picked 14th overall in the 1968 NFL Draft by the Eagles after being honored as an All American at USC.

Rossovich was known as a relentless, angry pass rusher who had tremendous strength off the edge. Rossovich made his only Pro Bowl in 1969. He also played for the Chargers and Oilers, as well as the short lived World Football League's Philadelphia Bell.

He was the subject of a 30 minute NFL Films movie, with the voice of the legendary John Facenda included.

Rossovich had a successful career after football, becoming an actor who appeared in 15 films.

He was the prototypical late 60s/early 70s pass rusher. Strong, smart, and hardworking, he was an excellent player in Trojan crimson and Eagle Green. He will be missed.


ROSSOVICH, Tim (Timothy John Rossovich)
Born: 3/14/1946, Palo Alto, California, U.S.A.
Died: 12/7/2018, Grass Valley, California, U.S.A.

Tim Rossovich’s western – actor:
The Long Riders – 1980 (Charlie Pitts)

Thursday, December 6, 2018

RIP John Board


The Globe and Mail
December 6, 2018

JOHN ANTHONY BOARD - born, October 22, 1934, John Anthony Board passed away December 2, 2018. John was a pillar in the Canadian Film Industry who collaborated as an Assistant Director, Producer and Mentor with the best and brightest film makers in Canada. His unique perspective, incisive intellect and boundless energy helped shape not only the projects he worked on, but how they were made. John is survived by his brothers, Stefan and Henry; his sons, Jason and Simon; and grandchildren, Rachel, Joanna, Alex, Sebastian and Sascha. A memorial service will be held on Sunday, December 9 at 10 a.m. at the Mount Pleasant Funeral Centre, 375 Mount Pleasant Road (east gate entrance).

BOARD, John (John Anthony Board)
Born: 10/22/1934, Canada
Died: 12/2/2018, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

John Board’s western – producer, assistant director:
The Grey Fox - 1982

RIP Charles Lester Kinsolving


Longtime WCBM-AM conservative talk radio host Les Kinsolving dies at 90

The Baltimore Sun
By Colin Campbell
December 5, 2018

Charles Lester “Les” Kinsolving, a retired WCBM-AM conservative talk radio personality who hosted the show “Uninhibited Radio” for 28 years, has died at 90, the station announced Tuesday.

Kinsolving, whose bright red blazer and outrageous talk show earned him national renown, was a “throwback to radio yesteryear [who] tries to shock, outrage and prod the world around him with his commentary,” according to a 1998 Baltimore Sun profile.

“From the loud red jacket to his blustery delivery,” The Sun reported, “Kinsolving guarantees a scene every time he walks into the room.”

The radio station did not give a cause of his death. A message left Wednesday at his Northern Virginia home was not returned.

Kinsolving had a heart attack at his Virginia home and underwent triple bypass surgery at Fairfax Hospital in Falls Church, Va., in January 2005, but returned to the air until a few months ago.

Sean Casey, who hosts the conservative “Sean and Frank in the Morning” program with Frank Luber on WCBM, called Kinsolving “a fearless reporter/broadcaster who confronted the Jim Jones cult, was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and covered the White House in his signature red jacket.”

On Kinsolving’s show, Casey said in a statement, “no sacred cows went unmilked.”

Casey said he hired Kinsolving at the station in 1990 at the urging of Tom Marr. Kinsolving was a “true patriot and a great American” whose retirement followed a decline in health, Casey said.

“It is so ironic that Les would pass the same week that [George H.W. Bush] left us, a [president] that he covered, and just days away from the annual Army-Navy game that he loved and would attend almost every year when health permitted,” Casey said in his statement. “Rest in peace, ‘my dear friend.’”


KINSOLVING, Charles Lester
Born: 12/18/1927, New York City, New York, U.S.A.
Died: 12/4/2018, Vienna, Virginia, U.S.A.

Charles Lester Kinsolving’s westerns – actor:
Gettysburg – 1993 (Brigadier General William Barksdale)
Gods and Generals – 2003 (General William Barksdale)

Wednesday, December 5, 2018

RIP John DF Black


'Star Trek' Writer-Producer John DF Black Dies at 85

STAR TREK DISCOVERY
December 5, 2018
John DF Black, a writer, producer, and story editor on Star Trek: The Original Series has passed away. He was 85.

The official Star Trek website reports that Black passed away of natural causes in California on November 29th. The news was confirmed by Black’s wife, Mary Black, and revealed by Black’s publisher, Jacobs/Brown Press.

Black has one solo Star Trek writing credit to his name. He wrote the teleplay for “The Nake Time,” a season one episode that was key in establishing the character of Spock as played by Leonard Nimoy. The episode earned Black a Hugo Award nomination.

Using the pseudonym Ralph Willis, Black returned to Star Trek to write the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode “Justice” in the show’s first season. He also received a “story by” credit for Next Generation’s “The Naked Now,” a spiritual sequel to “The Naked Time.”

“The Naked Now” was the fourth episode of Star Trek: The Original Series to air and is memorable for being the first time that the Vulcan nerve pinch appeared on screen (Spock’s signature maneuver was first filmed in the episode “The Enemy Within,” but the episodes aired out of order, with “The Enemy Within” premiering the week after “The Naked Time”).

The plot of “The Naked Time” saw the crew of the USS Enterprise infected with a contagion that stripped them of their inhibitions, leading to chaos throughout the ship. “The Naked Now,” based on an unfinished teleplay by Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry, was only the second episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation. It follows up on The Original Series episode with the crew of the USS Enterprise-D contracting an affliction that is very similar to the one that James Kirk’s crew encountered 100 years earlier.

Black provided commentary on the 50 Years of Star Trek and Star Trek: Inside the Roddenberry Vault home media releases.

Outside of the Star Trek realm, Black’s writing credits include work on The Unearthly, Lawman, Mr. Novak, Laredo, the Cathy Lee Crosby Wonder Woman pilot (which he also co-produced), The Fugitive, Mary Tyler Moore, Shaft, The Carey Treatment, Man from Atlantis, Charlie's Angels, The Clone Master and Murder, She Wrote. He also directed an episode of Charlie's Angels.

In 1972, Black won an Edgar Award from the Writers Guild of America for Best Television Feature or Miniseries Teleplay for his script for the television movie Thief.

Black is survived by his wife Mary, who worked as his executive secretary on Star Trek: The Original Series, as well as his two sons.


BLACK, John  DF (John Donald Francis Black)
Born: 12/30/1932, U.S.A.
Died: 11/29/2018, California, U.S.A

John DF Black’s westerns – writer:
Lawman (TV) – 1961, 1962
Have Gun – Will Travel (TV) - 1962
The Virginian (TV) – 1963, 1970
Laredo (TV) – 1965, 1966
Gunfight in Abilene - 1967
Cimarron Strip (TV) – 1967
Three Guns for Texas - 1968
The High Chaparral (TV) - 1969

Monday, December 3, 2018

RIP Geoff Murphy


Acclaimed Kiwi film director Geoff Murphy dies

New Zealand Herald
December 4, 2018

Acclaimed Kiwi film director Geoff Murphy has died.

Murphy, 80, was a leading figure in the fledgling New Zealand film industry in the 1970s - directing classic films including 1981's Goodbye Pork Pie, Utu and The Quiet Earth.

His career later took him to Hollywood, where he directed blockbusters including Young Guns II and the Steven Seagal train thriller Under Siege 2. Murphy also worked as a second unit director on Dante's Peak (directed by fellow Kiwi Roger Donaldson) and on Sir Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings.

The NZ Film Commission said it was "very saddened" to confirm Murphy had died yesterday.

In 2014 Murphy was made an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to film. He had previously been honoured as one of New Zealand's 20 greatest living artists when named an Arts Icon by the Arts Foundation.

Murphy was noted for his skill at action, knockabout comedy, and melding genres. He spent a decade directing in Hollywood before returning home, NZonscreen says in its biography of him.

He was married to filmmaker Merata Mita until her death in May 2010.

Murphy has also been a scriptwriter, special effects technician, schoolteacher and trumpet player.

He was a founding member of the hippy musical and theatrical co-operative Blerta, which toured New Zealand and Australia performing multi-media shows in the early 1970s.

Several Blerta members followed Murphy into film work - including the band's drummer Bruno Lawrence, who starred in Utu and The Quiet Earth.

Wellington filmmaker and friend Gaylene Preston said Murphy was a pioneer

"He took everybody with him. In those days there was very little in the way of equipment in New Zealand. It was Geoff who helped everyone else make their films."

His best works were Goodbye Pork Pie and Utu, Preston said.

"I think it is hard to understand what a terrific, cultural earthquake Pork Pie was. A film New Zealanders went to the movies, to see their own country and their own work.

"The film Utu was a great piece of world cinema.

"He is a towering figure and we have lost a great voice. Go well, Geoff."


MURPHY, Geoff (Geoffrey Peter Murphy)
Born: 6/13/1938, Wellington, New Zealand
Died: 12/3/2018, New Zealand

Geoff Murphy’s westerns – director:
Wild Man – 1977
Young Guns II – 1990
The Last Outlaw (TV) – 1993
The Magnificent Seven (TV) - 1998