Thursday, July 15, 2010

RIP Hank Cochran

FROM: Country Standard Time ~
By Staff

Hank Cochran, who had a hand in writing
the songs 'I Fall to Pieces' and 'Make the World
Go Away' and discovered Willie Nelson, died
Thursday at 74 of pancreatic cancer.

Cochran also was an artist in his own right,
charting 7 times between 1962 and 1980 with
his first single, 'Sally Was a Good Old Girl',
by Harland Howard hitting number 20.

Garland Perry Cochran was born Aug. 2, 1935
in Isola, Miss. He had a difficult childhood
marked by sickness, the divorce of his parents
and running away from an orphanage.

His uncle, Otis, taught him how to play guitar
while they hitchhiked from Mississippi to New
Mexico to work in the oil fields. He later moved
to California, forming The Cochran Brothers
with Eddie Cochran, although the two were
unrelated.

At 24, he moved to Nashville and wrote 'I Fall
to Pieces' with Howard. The song became
a huge hit for Patsy Cline, who also recorded
Cochran's 'She's Got You' and 'Why Can't He
Be You'.

Cochran wrote 'Make the World Go Away' after
going to the movies. The song became a big hit
for Ray Price and later Eddie Arnold.

Cochran also wrote songs for by Burl Ives
('A Little Bitty Tear', 'It's Just My Funny Way
of Laughin', 'The Same Old Hurt'). He also wrote
songs for George Strait ('The Chair' with Dean
Dillon and 'Ocean Front Property' with Dillon and
Royce Porter), Merle Haggard ('It's Not Love
(But It's Not Bad)'), 'Don't You Ever Get Tired
(of Hurting Me)', a number one song for Ronnie
Milsap, and Mickey Gilley ('That's All That
Matters').

Cochran also played a role in Nelson's career.
While working at publishing company Pamper
Music, Cochran hung out at Tootsie's Orchid
Lounge in Nashville. One of the singers
showing up was Nelson. Cochran liked what
he encouraged and encouraged management
to sign him.


COCHRAN, Hank (Garland Perry Cochran)
Born: 8/2/1935, Isola Mississippi, U.S.A.
Died: 7/15/2010, Nashvill, Tennessee, U.S.A.

Hank Cochran's western - soundtrack:
The Electric Horseman - 1979

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