Sunday, March 3, 2013

RIP George Ives



IVES, George George Ives passed away on Friday, February 22, 2013 at the age of 87 at his Brentwood home. He was a 50-year veteran of movies and the theater. The deep, melodious voice, excellent old-style diction, and the sheer screen and stage presence were his trademarks. Born in New York City in 1926, he made his stage debut in Walter Kerr's Stardust which closed before reaching Broadway. His Broadway debut came in 1947 in Alice in Arms. He appeared in numerous road productions including Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter starring Eddie Bracken, Janie, Silver Whistle and Charley's Aunt in between his work on Broadway in Present Laughter; You Never Can Tell; The Seven Year Itch; Season In The Sun; Mr Barry's Etchings; and Happy Town. He worked in postwar radio and television, including many anthology shows like Schlitz Playhouse of Stars, Theatre Guild on the Air, Studio One, The Philco Television Playhouse, and Kraft Television Theatre. He also did guest spots on Sargent Bilko and The Celeste Holm Show. He made his screen debut in 1952 in Niagra, starring Marilyn Monroe. On the West Coast, his other film appearances included Hot Rods to Hell with Dana Andrews, and the Paul Newman military comedy The Secret War of Harry Frigg. In between theater roles, he continued working on television into the 1960s, After moving to Hollywood he landed his first regular series when in 1961, he was cast in a sitcom called The Hathaways, with Jack Weston and Peggy Cass. Ives' 6-foot-2-inch height, dignified appearance, and resonant voice often got him cast as authority figures, and he did numerous other series such as The Beverly Hillbillies, Green Acres, Get Smart, and Bewitched. In 1965, Ives got his best regular TV role, co-starring as Doc in the series MR. ROBERTS, based on the John Ford/Mervyn LeRoy navy drama. Working in the shadow of William Powell, who had played the part in the movie, he made the role of the ship's doctor work for him on his terms. Ives remained active in theater all the while he was working on TV and movie projects, and in the early '70s, he was asked by Actors' Equity Association to take on an executive position with the organization on the West Coast. He eventually became Western Regional Director of the union's operations there, a position which precluded him from doing much other work. Ives finally retired from the union in the '90s and started working as an actor again. During his second on-camera career, George starred in a Honda commercial directed by Joel and Ethan Coen. This project led to the Coen Brothers asking him to do a special introduction to their film Blood Simple for its DVD release. Since then, he has been a regular participant in their work, including his memorable role as the plaintiff's attorney in Intolerable Cruelty. Until shortly before his death, Ives served for several decades as President of the charitable organization Theatre Authority West, a non-profit organization that administers and regulates the free appearances of performers and provides assistance to members of the entertainment industry. Throughout his life he dedicated himself completely to the betterment of all in the theatrical community. George Ives leaves behind his beloved wife, Elizabeth; three children: Cathleen, Marguerite and Monty; nine grandchildren as well as six great-grandchildren. In lieu of a memorial service, at his request, donations can be made to the Actor's Fund in his name.

IVES, George
Born: 1/19/1926, New York City, New York, U.S.A.
Died: 2/22/2013, Brentwood, California, U.S.A.

George Ives western – actor:
The Ballad of Josie – 1967 (Freemont)

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